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What is COVID-19?

Coronavirus Disease 2019: Myth vs. Fact

https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/conditions-and-diseases/coronavirus/2019-novel-coronavirus-myth-versus-fact

Reviewed By:

There's a lot of information circulating about COVID-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus, so it’s important to know what’s true and what’s not. Lisa Maragakis, M.D., M.P.H., senior director of infection prevention at Johns Hopkins, helps clarify information to help keep you and your family healthy and safe.

TRUE or FALSE? A vaccine to cure COVID-19 is available.

The answer is false.

There is no vaccine for the new coronavirus right now. Scientists have already begun working on one, but developing a vaccine that is safe and effective in human beings will take many months.

TRUE or FALSE? You can protect yourself from COVID-19 by swallowing or gargling with bleach, taking acetic acid or steroids, or using essential oils, salt water, ethanol or other substances.

The answer is false.

None of these recommendations protects you from getting COVID-19, and some of these practices may be dangerous. The best ways to protect yourself from this coronavirus (and other viruses) include:

Washing your hands frequently and thoroughly, using soap and hot water.

Avoiding close contact with people who are sick, sneezing or coughing.

In addition, you can avoid spreading your own germs by coughing into the crook of your elbow and staying home when you are sick.

TRUE or FALSE? The new coronavirus was deliberately created or released by people.

The answer is false.

Viruses can change over time. Occasionally, a disease outbreak happens when a virus that is common in an animal such as a pig, bat or bird undergoes changes and passes to humans. This is likely how the new coronavirus came to be.

TRUE or FALSE? Ordering or buying products shipped from overseas will make a person sick.

The answer is false.

Researchers are studying the new coronavirus to learn more about how it infects people. As of this writing, the World Health Organization (WHO) says that the likelihood of becoming infected with COVID-19 from a commercial package is low since it has likely traveled over several days and been exposed to different temperatures and conditions during transit.

TRUE or FALSE? A face mask will protect you from COVID-19.

The answer is false.

Certain models of professional, tight-fitting respirators (such as the N95) can protect health care workers as they care for infected patients.

For the general public without respiratory illness, wearing lightweight disposable surgical masks is not recommended. Because they don’t fit tightly, they may allow tiny infected droplets to get into the nose, mouth or eyes. Also, people with the virus on their hands who touch their face under a mask might become infected.

People with a respiratory illness can wear these masks to lessen their chance of infecting others. Bear in mind that stocking up on masks makes fewer available for sick patients and health care workers who need them.

What You Need to Know
Sen. Chuck Grassley
Mar 26 · 4 min read
 
 
 
 
 

Q: Who is eligible for a recovery rebate?

A: All U.S. residents or citizens with adjusted gross income under $75,000 ($112,500 for head of household and $150,000 married), who are not the dependent of another taxpayer and have a work-eligible Social Security Number, are eligible for the full $1,200 ($2,400 married) rebate. They are also eligible for an additional $500 per child. A typical family of four is eligible for a $3,400 recovery rebate.

Q: What about taxpayers with adjusted gross income over $75,000 ($112,500 for head of household and $150,000 married)? Are they eligible to receive any rebate?

A: The rebate amount is reduced by $5 for each $100 that a taxpayer’s income exceeds the phase-out threshold. The amount is completely phased-out for single filers with incomes exceeding $99,000, $146,500 for head of household filers with one child, and $198,000 for joint filers with no children. For a typical family of four, the amount is completely phased out for those with adjusted gross incomes exceeding $218,000.

Q: What if my income was above the threshold in 2019, but I’ve lost my job due to the corona virus? Can I still get a rebate check?

A: If your income in 2019 was in the phase-out range you would still receive a partial rebate based on your 2019 tax return. However, the rebate is actually an advance on a tax credit that you may claim on your 2020 tax return. If your income is lower in 2020 than in 2019, any additional credit you are eligible for will be refunded or reduce your tax liability when you file your 2020 tax return next year.

Q: Is the rebate taxable or will I have to pay back any amount if the rebate based on my 2019 return is larger than what it would be if based on my 2020 tax year return?

A: No, the rebate is treated like other refundable tax credits, such as the child tax credit and earned income tax credit, and not considered income. Moreover, if the credit amount you qualify based on 2020 income is less than what you qualify for based on your 2019 tax return, it does not have to be paid back.

Q: Who qualifies as a child for purposes of the rebate?

A: Any child who is a qualifying child for the purposes of the Child Tax Credit is also a qualifying child for the purposes of the recovery rebate. In general, a child is any dependent of a taxpayer under the age of 17.

Q: Do dependents, other than children under 17, qualify a taxpayer for an additional $500 per dependent?

A: No, the additional $500 per child is limited to children under 17.

Q: Are individuals with little to no income or those on means-tested federal benefits, such as SSI, eligible for a recovery rebate?

A: Yes, there is no qualifying income requirement. Even individuals with $0 of income are eligible for a rebate so long as they are not the dependent of another taxpayer and have a work-eligible SSN.

Q: Are seniors whose only income is from Social Security or a veteran whose only income is a veterans’ disability payment eligible?

A: Yes, as long as they are not the dependent of another taxpayer. The bill also provides IRS with additional tools to locate and provide rebates to low-income seniors who normally do not file a tax return by allowing them to base a rebate on Form SSA-1099, Social Security Benefit Statement or Form RRB-1099, which is the equivalent of the Social Security statement for Railroad Employees. However, seniors are still encouraged to file their 2019 tax return to ensure they receive their recovery rebate as quickly as possible.

Q: Are college students eligible for a recovery rebate?

A: Only if they are not considered a dependent of their parents. Generally, a full-time college student under the age of 24 is considered a dependent if their parent(s) provide more than half of their support.

Q: I am eligible for a rebate, what do I have to do to receive it?

A: For the vast majority of Americans, no action on their part will be required to receive a rebate check since the IRS will use a taxpayer’s 2019 tax return if filed or their 2018 return if they haven’t filed their 2019 return. This includes many individuals with very low income who file a tax return despite not owing any tax in order to take advantage of the refundable Earned Income Tax Credit and Child Tax Credit.

Q: What should I do if I did not file a tax return for 2019 or 2018?

A: The best way to ensure you receive a recovery rebate is to file a 2019 tax return if you have not already done so. This could be accomplished for free online from home using the IRS Free file program (https://www.irs.gov/filing/free-file-do-your-federal-taxes-for-free). The bill also instructs the IRS to engage in a public campaign to alert all individuals of their eligibility for the rebate and how to receive it if they have not filed either a 2019 or 2018 tax return.

Q: If I have a past due debt to a federal or state agency, or owe back taxes, will my rebate be reduced?

A: No, the bill turns off nearly all administrative offsets that ordinarily may reduce tax refunds for individuals who have past tax debts, or who are behind on other payments to federal or state governments, including student loan payments. The only administrative offset that will be enforced applies to those who have past due child support payments that the states have reported to the Treasury Department.

*The above information is prepared by Republican Finance Committee staff for informational purposes and should not be relied on for legal advice. Individuals should consult the IRS or a tax advisor to address questions related to their individual circumstances.

Unemployment Benefits

COVID19 - Unemployment Insurance Frequently Asked Questions

Q: What does it mean that the Unemployment Insurance Waiting Week is waived?
Under normal circumstances, the first week of an unemployment insurance claim does not receive payment. The Governor has opted to waive this if you were laid off due to COVID-19. This does not mean that you will receive benefits immediately. Kentucky pays unemployment benefits every two weeks.  

​Q: When will I get my benefits?
Benefits can only be paid after the week has passed (example: you cannot claim the week ending March 5th until March 6th or after). Benefits are paid every other week or also known as bi-weekly.

Q: What does it mean that the Job Search requirement is waived?
Under the COVID-19 state of emergency job search requirements are temporarily waived for all recipients of UI.

Q: When do I need to request my first payment?
Kentuckians affected by COVID-19 will receive payment for their first two weeks automatically after 13 days from the day the initial claim was filed. You will need to request your next payment by either by calling 1-877-369-5984 or www.kewes.ky.gov​. You will receive further information for subsequent check requests via email after the first payment is processed. 

Q: When filing my claim, is COVID-19 considered a natural disaster?
No. COVID-19, while being declared a state of emergency, is not a natural disaster.  

Q: What happens if I can’t return to work because of COVID-19? 
You will continue to draw benefits until your employer begins operations. However, if you filed your claim and reported a date that you were returning to work, you will need to contact the UI Help Line to adjust/correct that information at 502-564-2900.  

Q: How much can I expect as my weekly benefit amount?
You may estimate your weekly benefit amount by going to http://apps.kcc.ky.gov/career/WuiCalculator.aspx 

​​​Enter your earnings into the appropriate quarters. 

You can log into your account 24 hours after submitting your claim, go to the Account Summary page and it will display your benefit amount.

NOTE: If you have wages from out of state or from employment with the Federal government, those wages may not be reflected immediately.

Q: I tried to create an account but it says my information already exists?
The system you are accessing may contain information back to 2003. If your attempt to register as a New User shows an error stating that social already exists in our system, you will need to click ‘Cancel’. From the Log In screen, click ‘Forgot’ PIN. When prompted, enter your social security number and any name variation you may have used since 2003 (maiden, former married, shortened name i.e. John instead of Johnathan, etc.). Also note that if you have a suffix (Jr, Sr, etc), those fields are spacing and punctuation sensitive. Attempt with and without punctuation. If you are still unable to access the system, contact the UI Assistance line at (502) 564-2900, option 5, then option 6.

Q: Is there an extension for those who have exhausted a claim and aren’t eligible to file a new one? 
Yes. The recently approved federal CARES Act has extended the number of weeks from 26 to 39. Individuals whose UI eligibility expired on or after January 27, 2020 are eligible to apply for the 13 week extension.

Q: My name has changed/is incorrect. Can I change it myself?
You are not able to change your name yourself, as this requires legal documentation. To expedite this process, log into your account, go to Document Upload, and upload a PDF or photo format of 2 forms of verification of your current name (State issued ID, Driver’s License, Social Security Card, Birth Certificate, Marriage/Divorce Decree, Passport or Military ID). Once the documentation has been uploaded, your file will be updated as soon as possible.​

Q: What is available for the self-employed/contractors?
Unemployment Insurance benefits have been expanded due to COVID-19 to include groups that are typically not covered by UI:

​​​​Self-employed

Independent contractors

Freelance workers

S​ubstitute teachers

Childcare workers employed by religious-affiliated organizations and non-profits

​It also includes people leaving employment because of COVID-19 due to:

​​​​​Reasonable risk of exposure (self-quarantine)

Caring for a family member affected by COVID-19

Q: Will UI payments be increased by $600 per week and when?
Yes. All weekly payments will increase by $600.  This will begin the week of March 29, 2020.

Example, if my benefit payment was $320 per week it will now be $920 per week starting on March 29, 2020.  You will receive two payments one for $320 and one for $600.  Under the CARE Act, the $600 payment is paid 100% by the federal government and will not be charged to employer accounts.

Q: I have worked part time over the past year and typically would not qualify, can I apply?
Yes. Under the CARES Act those who have worked part-time over the past year will now qualify for UI. You will get the weekly benefit amount you qualify plus the $600. You will receive two payments. One for the weekly benefit amount and one for the weekly $600.​

 

This link covers the US Dept of Labor

https://www.dol.gov/agencies/whd/pandemic/ffcra-employee-paid-leave

 

https://www.dol.gov/agencies/whd/pandemic

 

Unemployment Insurance

Unemployment Fact Sheet
FMLA Information

COVID-19 and the Family and
Medical Leave Act Questions and
Answers19 and the Family and
Medical Leave Act Questionswers
If you or your employees are out with the flu or are caring for ill family members, check with
the Department of Labor (DOL) for information on whether such leave is covered under
the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA). Under the FMLA, covered employers must provide
employees job-protected, unpaid leave for specified family and medical reasons, which may
include the flu where complications arise. Employees on FMLA leave are entitled to
the continuation of group health insurance coverage under the same terms as existed before they
took FMLA leave.
——————«»——————
Which employees are eligible to take FMLA leave?
Employees are eligible to take FMLA leave if they work for a covered employer and:
• have worked for their employer for at least 12 months;
• have at least 1,250 hours of service over the previous 12 months; and
• work at a location where at least 50 employees are employed by the employer within 75 miles.
Special hours of service requirements apply to airline flight crew employees and to breaks in
service to fulfill National Guard or Reserve military service obligations pursuant to the
Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act (USERRA). (See the U.S.
Department of Labor Wage and Hour Division or call 1-866-487-9243 for additional information
on FMLA.)
Must an employer grant leave to an employee who is sick or who is caring for a family
member that is sick?
An employee who is sick or whose family members are sick may be entitled to leave under the
FMLA under certain circumstances. The FMLA entitles eligible employees of covered
employers to take up to 12 weeks of unpaid, job-protected leave in a designated 12-month leave
year for specified family and medical reasons. This may include the flu where complications
arise that create a “serious health condition” as defined by the FMLA. Employees on FMLA
leave are entitled to the continuation of group health insurance coverage under the same
conditions as coverage would have been provided if the employee had been continuously
employed during the leave period.
Workers who are ill with pandemic influenza or have a family member with influenza are urged
to stay home to minimize the spread of the pandemic. Employers are encouraged to support these
and other community mitigation strategies and should consider flexible leave policies for their
employees.
Can an employee stay home under FMLA leave to avoid getting pandemic influenza?
The FMLA protects eligible employees who are incapacitated by a serious health condition, as
may be the case with the flu where complications arise, or who are needed to care for covered
family members who are incapacitated by a serious health condition. Leave taken by an
employee for the purpose of avoiding exposure to the flu would not be protected under the
FMLA. Employers should encourage employees who are ill with pandemic influenza or are
exposed to ill family members to stay home and should consider flexible leave policies for their
employees in these circumstances.
What legal responsibility do employers have to allow parents or care givers time off from
work to care for the sick or children who have been dismissed from school?
Covered employers must abide by the FMLA as well as any applicable state FMLA laws. An
employee who is sick, or whose family members are sick, may be entitled to leave under the
FMLA. The FMLA entitles eligible employees of covered employers to take up to 12 weeks of
unpaid, job-protected leave in a designated 12-month leave year for specified family and medical
reasons which may include the flu where complications arise that create a “serious health
condition” as defined by the FMLA.
There is currently no federal law covering non-government employees who take off from work
to care for healthy children, and employers are not required by federal law to provide leave to
employees caring for dependents who have been dismissed from school or child care. However,
given the potential for significant illness under some pandemic influenza scenarios, employers
should review their leave policies to consider providing increased flexibility to their employees
and their families. Remember that federal law mandates that any flexible leave policies must be
administered in a manner that does not discriminate against employees because of race, color,
sex, national origin, religion, age (40 and over), disability, or veteran status.
Is an employer required by law to provide paid sick leave to employees who are out of
work because they have pandemic influenza, have been exposed to a family member with
influenza, or are caring for a family member with influenza?
Federal law generally does not require employers to provide paid leave to employees who are
absent from work because they are sick with pandemic flu, have been exposed to someone with
the flu or are caring for someone with the flu, although pursuant to Executive Order 13706, some
federal contractors may be required to provide such leave to employees under certain
circumstances, such as if the employee or a family member is sick with the flu or seeking care
related to the flu. Certain state or local laws may have different requirements, which should be
independently considered by employers when determining their obligation to provide paid sick
leave.
If the leave qualifies as FMLA-protected leave, the statute allows the employee to elect or the
employer to require the substitution of paid sick and paid vacation/personal leave in some
circumstances. Employers should encourage employees that are ill with pandemic influenza to
stay home and should consider flexible leave policies for their employees.
May employers send employees home if they show symptoms of pandemic influenza? Can
the employees be required to take sick leave? Do they have to be paid? May employers
prevent employees from coming to work?
It is important to prepare a plan of action specific to your workplace, given that a pandemic
influenza outbreak could affect many employees. This plan or policy could permit you to send
employees home, but the plan and the employment decisions must comply with the laws
prohibiting discrimination in the workplace on the basis of race, sex, age (40 and over), color,
religion, national origin, disability, or veteran status. It would also be prudent to notify
employees (and if applicable, their bargaining unit representatives) about decisions made under
this plan or policy at the earliest feasible time.
Your company policies on sick leave, and any applicable employment contracts or collective
bargaining agreements would determine whether you should provide paid leave to employees
who are not at work. If the leave qualifies as FMLA-protected leave, the statute allows the
employee to elect or the employer to require the substitution of paid sick and paid
vacation/personal leave in some circumstances. (See the U.S. Department of Labor Wage and
Hour Division for additional information or call 1-866-487-9243 if you have any questions.)
Remember when making these decisions to exclude employees from the workplace, you cannot
discriminate on the basis of race, sex, age (40 and over), color, religion, national origin,
disability, union membership or veteran status. However, you may exclude an employee with a
disability from the workplace if you:
• obtain objective evidence that the employee poses a direct threat (i.e. significant risk of
substantial harm); and
• determine that there is no available reasonable accommodation (that would not pose an undue
hardship) to eliminate the direct threat.
(See the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s Enforcement Guidance: DisabilityRelated Inquiries and Medical Examinations of Employees under the Americans with
Disabilities Act for additional information.)
May an employer require an employee who is out sick with pandemic influenza to provide
a doctor’s note, submit to a medical exam, or remain symptom-free for a specified amount
of time before returning to work?
Yes. However, employers should consider that during a pandemic, healthcare resources may be
overwhelmed and it may be difficult for employees to get appointments with doctors or other
health care providers to verify they are well or no longer contagious.
During a pandemic health crisis, under the Americans with Disabilities Act1 (ADA), an
employer would be allowed to require a doctor’s note, a medical examination, or a time period
during which the employee has been symptom free, before it allows the employee to return to
work. Specifically, an employer may require the above actions of an employee where it has a
reasonable belief – based on objective evidence – that the employee’s present medical condition
would
• impair his ability to perform essential job functions (i.e., fundamental job duties) with or
without reasonable accommodation, or,
• pose a direct threat (i.e., significant risk of substantial harm that cannot be reduced or
eliminated by reasonable accommodation) to safety in the workplace.
In situations in which an employee’s leave is covered by the FMLA, the employer may have a
uniformly-applied policy or practice that requires all similarly-situated employees to obtain and
present certification from the employee’s health care provider that the employee is able to
resume work. Employers are required to notify employees in advance if the employer will
require a fitness-for-duty certification to return to work. If state or local law or the terms of a
collective bargaining agreement govern an employee’s return to work, those provisions shall be
applied. Employers should be aware that fitness-for-duty certifications may be difficult to obtain
during a pandemic.
May employers change their paid sick leave policy if a number of employees are out and
they cannot afford to pay them all?
Federal equal employment opportunity laws do not prohibit employers from changing their paid
sick leave policy if it is done in a manner that does not discriminate between employees because
of race, sex, age (40 and over), color, religion, national origin, disability, or veteran status. Be
sure also to consult state and local laws.
In addition, you should consider that if your workforce is represented by a labor union and the
collective bargaining agreement covers sick leave policies, you may be limited in either the
manner in which you change the policy or the manner of the changes themselves because the
collective bargaining agreement would be controlling. In a workplace without a collective
bargaining agreement, employees may have a contractual right to any accrued sick leave, but not
future leave.
Your sick leave policy also has to follow the requirements of the FMLA (if your employees are
covered by the Act), and it needs to be consistent with federal workplace anti-discrimination
laws, such as the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). (See the U.S. Department of
Labor, Wage and Hour Division or call 1-866-487-9243 for additional information on
FMLA. See the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission or call 1-800-669-4000 if
you have questions on ADA.)
If an employer temporarily closes his or her place of business because of an influenza
pandemic and chooses to lay off some but not all employees, are there any federal laws that
would govern this decision?
The federal laws prohibiting discrimination in the workplace on the basis of race, sex, age (40
and over), color, religion, national origin, or disability may apply. (See the U.S. Equal
Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) or call 1-800-669-4000 if you have
questions.) Other specific Federal laws that prohibit discrimination on these or additional bases
may also govern if an employer is a Federal contractor or a recipient of Federal financial
assistance.
Additionally, the Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification (WARN) Act helps ensure
advance notice in cases of qualified plant closings and mass layoffs. For more information about
the WARN Act see https://www.dol.gov/agencies/eta/layoffs/warn.
You may also not discriminate against an employee because the employee has requested or used
qualifying FMLA leave. (See the U.S. Department of Labor, Wage and Hour Division for
additional information or call 1-866-487-9243 if you have questions.)
In addition, you may not discriminate against an employee because he or she is a past or present
member of the United States uniformed service. (See the U.S. Department of Labor, Veterans’
Employment and Training Service for additional information or call 1-866-889-5627 if you have
questions.)
Some employees may not be able to come to work because they have to take care of sick
family members. May an employer lay them off?
It depends. If an employee is covered and eligible under the FMLA and is needed to care for a
spouse, daughter, son, or parent who has a serious health condition, then the employee is entitled
to up to 12 weeks of job-protected, unpaid leave during any 12-month period. Some states may
have similar family leave laws. In those situations, covered employers must comply with the
federal or state provision that provides the greater benefit to their employees. (See the U.S.
Department of Labor, Wage and Hour Division for additional information or call 1-866-487-
9243 if you have questions.)
In lieu of laying off employees in this situation, we would encourage you to consider other
options such as telecommuting and to prepare a plan of action specific to your workplace.
What types of policy options do employers have for preventing abuse of leave?
Both the FMLA and the Americans with Disabilities Act affect the provision of leave.
Under the FMLA, employees seeking to use FMLA leave are required to provide 30-day
advance notice of the need to take FMLA leave when the need is foreseeable and such notice is
practicable. In addition, employers may require employees to provide:
• medical certification supporting the need for leave due to a serious health condition affecting the
employee or a spouse, son, daughter or parent, including periodic re-certification;
• second or third medical opinions (at the employer's expense);
• periodic reports during FMLA leave regarding the employee's status and intent to return to
work; and
• consistent with a uniformly-applied policy or practice for similarly-situated employees, a fitness
for duty certification. (Employers should be aware that fitness-for-duty certifications may be
difficult to obtain during a pandemic.) (See also: “May an employer require an employee who is
out sick with pandemic influenza to provide a doctor’s note, submit to a medical exam, or
remain symptom-free for a specified amount of time before returning to work?”)
The FMLA also allows the employee to elect or the employer to require the substitution of paid
sick and paid vacation/personal leave in some circumstances. (See the U.S. Department of
Labor Wage and Hour Division for additional information on the FMLA or call 1-866-487-9243
if you have questions.)
Under the Americans with Disabilities Act, qualified individuals with disabilities may be entitled
to unscheduled leave, unpaid leave, or modifications to the employer sick leave policies as
“reasonable accommodations.” These are modifications or adjustments to jobs, work
environments, or workplace polices that enable qualified employees with disabilities to perform
the essential functions (i.e., fundamental duties) of their jobs and have equal opportunities to
receive the benefits available to employees without disabilities. (See the U.S. Equal
Employment Opportunity Commission’s Enforcement Guidance: Reasonable Accommodation
and Undue Hardship under the Americans with Disabilities Act for additional information.)
For further information about Coronavirus, please visit the HHS’s Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention

COVID-19 Fact Sheet

Local Food Open
Be Careful of Scams
Please be smart and watch out for common scams that may come about right now.
  • Stimulus check or relief scam - The government is discussing sending money to individuals by check or direct deposit to help ease the economic impact caused by the virus. The government will not ask for a fee or personal account information to receive these funds.
  • Offers for a COVID-19 vaccine, cure or treatment – If there is a medical breakthrough, it would not be communicated through unsolicited email or online ads. Rely on official sources for the most up-to-date information about the virus.
  • Investment scams - Watch out for anyone claiming that products or services of publicly traded companies can prevent, detect, or cure COVID-19.
  • Charity scams – Do research before making any donations. Especially any that are requesting payments in cash, by wire transfer, gift card, or through the mail.
  • Bank/FDIC scams - Scammers may attempt to impersonate FDIC or bank employees and falsely claim that banks are limiting access to deposits or that there are security issues with bank deposits.
  • The safest place for your money is in the bank – The bank provides for physical security and it is federally insured. You do not have these protections when your money is taken out of the bank.
Use multi-factor authentication when available – Multi-factor authentication (MFA) provides increased security that provides a second step to verify who you are, like a text, email, or phone call.
 

Corona Virus Education

Many people have questions and concerns about the coronavirus and how it may impact them.  To support our clients and communities, we have prepared the attached educational information with helpful links to common sense prevention, what higher risk people should consider, and contacts for the CDC for more resources and information.

Julie Russell

Director of Sales & Marketing

BluMine Health

2843 Brownsboro Rd, Suite 201

Louisville, KY 40206

www.bluminehealth.com

Click Here To Learn More
rescheduled pic

Shelby Showcase

Join us March 21st for the Shelby Showcase being held at Martha Layne Collins High School

10:00 am - 2:00 pm
MLC High School

Click Here for More Details & To Register
Lane Report

Shelby County, KY: World-Class Host

August 29, 2019

Greater Louisville & Southern IndianaKnown as the “American Saddlebred Capital of the World,” Shelby County is home to world-class equestrian events. It also houses the Presidential Mint Julep Cup at Wakefield-Scearce Galleries in Shelbyville and was designed by the gallery’s co-founder during Franklin Roosevelt’s administration. Old Stone Inn & Tavern in Simpsonville is more than 200 years old and now has a new owner and executive chef, David Danielson, who is also the executive chef at Churchill Downs.

Bourbon has been a draw in the county since the 2016 opening of Jeptha Creed Distillery, followed by Bulleit Distilling Co. a year later. Bulleit’s 300-acre campus has a 52-foot still and four barrel houses, each capable of holding 55,000 barrels, and a new visitor center. To attract more groups and individual travelers, ShelbyKY Tourism spreads the word nationally and recently received two Traverse Awards from the Kentucky Travel Industry Association Board.

County Seat: Shelbyville; David Eaton, mayor; shelbyvillekentucky.com

Estimated 2019 population: 48,518

Number of households: 16,369

Median household income: $63,171

Shelby County Chamber of Commerce: Belinda Nichols, president; shelbycountykychamber.com

Judge-Executive: Dan Ison; shelbycountykentucky.com

ShelbyKY Tourism & Visitors Bureau: Katie Fussenegger, executive director; visitshelbyky.com

Upcoming Events

Welcome New Members

connect possible

In 1926, a group of business and professional people in our community joined together to find ways to advance and enhance Shelby County.  Since that time, the Chamber has been working to improve the economic well-being of our community by coordinating ideas, energy, and financial resources to accomplish collectively what none of us could accomplish individually.

We invite you to join us as we continue to support commerce and promote growth to enhance the quality of life in Shelby County.

Come and CONNECT, BUILD and GROW with us!

A special thanks to our Presidential Sponsors for their continued support!

Pres Partners 2020
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